3 elements that enchant customers

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Guy Kawasaki chimes in on the MUFSO conference (multi-unit food service operator) with how to enchant customers. Simply put, ““The three key points of enchantment: You need to be likeable, trustworthy and [offer] quality. You want the quality of Apple; you want the trustworthiness of [online footwear peddler] Zappos; and you want the likeability of Richard Branson [of Virgin Atlantic Airways], who gets down on his knees and polishes your shoes so you will fly Virgin,” Kawasaki said.

He raises a great point. Enchanting customers can turn them into Brand Champions. These people are the backbone of your business. They’re loyal. They talk about you to others with excitement. They spend money and bring others in to spend money. They’re your number one raving fans.
To start the enchantment you need to have yourself buttoned up first. Your concept needs to be strong and airtight. You need to be likeable, trustworthy and offer quality. But, what do those elements mean?
Likeability. To be liked means more than making decent food. Likeability goes into the concept’s core. It’s all about EXCEEDING expectations. People expect good service. That’s parody. What can you do to extend that service in a way that surprises the customer? Maybe add some humor to the experience at the counter. Maybe you offer extra attention at the table to the guests?
Trustworthy. Don’t lie. If you’re farm fresh, you better be farm fresh. Organic? You better be. Once a patron finds out that your menu or experience contain half truths, your trustworthiness is shot… nearly forever.
Quality. The one word everyone claims, but not many really hit. Quality is something that must be seen throughout the entire brand and concept. EVERY TOUCH POINT must be quality. What is it? Quality is the absence of non-quality cues. A Filet Mignon for $14 is NOT quality because the price devalues it. It’s a non-quality cue. A waiter wearing a faded black shirt with crusty food on it instead of a fresh, crisp black shirt is a non-quality cue.
These are just the beginning elements of enchanting your guests. These are the foundations and tie-in with your concept and brand. What non-quality cues are you sending out? What makes your concept likeable? Unlikeable? Are you really trustworthy?

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